The high-profile candidates, Judge Merrick Garland and U.S. Senator John Cornyn of Texas, have distanced themselves from the selection process at the recommendation of their advisers. The advisers, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the new FBI director would have little job security and heightened scrutiny by political observers following President Donald Trump's abrupt firing of James Comey May 9. Furthermore, the candidates would be leaving important, secure jobs for one fraught with politics and controversy. Garland, the chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and a moderate Democrat who former President Obama nominated last year for a then-vacant seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, "loves his job and is not interested in leaving the judiciary," said one source familiar with the judge's thinking. Cornyn said in a statement he had informed the White House that "the best way I can serve is continuing to fight for a conservative agenda in the U.S. Senate." "It's becoming increasingly difficult to attract good people to work in this administration," said one senior official. "In other cases, veteran people with expertise are leaving or seeking posts overseas and away from this White House."

Top Two Picks for FBI Director Convey Disinterest

The search for a new FBI director hit a few setbacks Tuesday when two potential prospects signaled they were not interested in the position.

The high-profile candidates, Judge Merrick Garland and U.S. Senator John Cornyn of Texas, have distanced themselves from the selection process at the recommendation of their advisers.

The advisers, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the new FBI director would have little job security and heightened scrutiny by political observers following President Donald Trump's abrupt firing of James Comey May 9. Furthermore, the candidates would be leaving important, secure jobs for one fraught with politics and controversy.

Garland, the chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and a moderate Democrat who former President Obama nominated last year for a then-vacant seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, "loves his job and is not interested in leaving the judiciary," said one source familiar with the judge's thinking.

Cornyn said in a statement he had informed the White House that "the best way I can serve is continuing to fight for a conservative agenda in the U.S. Senate."

"It's becoming increasingly difficult to attract good people to work in this administration," said one senior official. "In other cases, veteran people with expertise are leaving or seeking posts overseas and away from this White House."

 

 

Posted in General News

Tags: FBI, Donald Trump

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