Baltimore Police Barrier

DOJ Won’t Prosecute Officers in Freddie Gray Case

Citing insufficient evidence, the Department of Justice announced Tuesday the six Baltimore police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray on April 19th, 2015 will not face federal charges.

After officers in the case were cleared last July of criminal charges brought by the Baltimore prosecutor ranging from manslaughter to murder for their role in Gray’s death from a spinal chord injury while riding in the back of a police van, DOJ began a criminal civil rights investigation into the matter.

“After an extensive review of this tragic event, conducted by career prosecutors and investigators, the Justice Department concluded that the evidence is insufficient to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Officer Caesar Goodson, Officer William Porter, Officer Garrett Miller, Officer Edward Nero, Lieutenant Brian Rice, or Sergeant Alicia White willfully violated Gray’s civil rights,” the DOJ said in a statement Tuesday. “Accordingly, the investigation into this incident has been closed without prosecution.”

Furthermore, DOJ said the evidence did indicate Gray was given a “rough ride” in the back of a police transport van—a theory proposed by state prosecutors—and did not prove that officers were aware that their failure to secure Gray with a seat belt put him in danger. Evidence did not show that officers knew he was injured and needed immediate medical care, the DOJ statement said.

DOJ officials also acknowledged just how much evidence would be needed to prove federal charges.

“It is not enough to show that the officer made a mistake, acted negligently, acted by accident, or even exercised bad judgment,” the Justice Department said. “Although Gray’s death is undeniably tragic, the evidence in this case is insufficient to meet these substantial evidentiary requirements.”

The six officers remain employed by the Baltimore Police Department and this decision all but precludes the likelihood of them ever facing consequences for this death.

 

Posted in The Takedown

Tags: DOJ, civil rights, police vehicles

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