Need Time Off for Religious Holidays in 2019? Know Your Responsibilities

As summer time-off requests come to an end, it’s time to start thinking about your religious observances and any time off you may need in the coming months. Previous Office of Personnel Management regulations concerning religious compensatory time rules and procedures were thought by many HR professionals to be vague, resulting in inconsistencies amongst agencies. This past spring, OPM issued its long awaited final regulations to clarify provisions concerning religious compensatory time, allowing employees to accrue and use compensatory time for religious purposes. According to OPM, this benefit “support[s] the President’s Management Agenda by clarifying the rules…that in turn help agencies to become careful stewards of taxpayer dollars.”

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Post, Like, Comment, Share – But Check Your Guidelines Every Year

We all like our social media, but is it worth losing your job over?   In just a few short years, social media has become a ubiquitous commodity in the workplace. It allows for employees to make and support professional connections, to collaborate easily and effectively, and to share necessary information in real time. Many agencies have embraced the technology in recent years and use it quite effectively to raise awareness about important public issues, as a crisis communication tool during emergencies, and to build public trust by offering authenticity and transparency.

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FEDS Protection is Now Available to Federal Task Force Officers

FEDS Protection now provides its professional liability insurance to Federal Task Force Officers. We appreciate the dangerous work and sacrifices these officers make alongside their federal counterparts and recognize that TFOs are vulnerable to the very same allegations and lawsuits that face Federal Law Enforcement Officers. These lawsuits, commonly referred to as Bivens actions against federal employees (and 1983 actions against state and local LEOs) usually involve an alleged violation under the Fourth Amendment claiming an unlawful search or seizure or some other constitutional tort (i.e., 1st, 5th or 8th Amendment violations) arising out of an enforcement action.

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