The Warren Commission Report: How the Kennedy Assassination Changed the US Secret Service

On November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a car through downtown Dallas. It was an event that shocked the nation and became a cultural touchstone for a generation of Americans who can vividly remember where they were when they heard the news. In the months following the assassination, there was a desperate need to understand what had happened, why it happened, and if it could have been prevented.

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The Rescue of Eagle One: How did a real-life helicopter end up hanging in a museum?

It’s one of the first things we hear as a group of students makes its way down the stairs to the admissions desk: “Is that a helicopter?!” Yup. “Is it real?” Sure is. The story of how Eagle One came to rest here, hanging above the exhibit space in the National Law Enforcement Museum, is a good one to tell.

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The Beginning of American K9 Units: A Brief History

Law enforcement agencies use man’s best friend to assist in a variety of tasks; to not only make their jobs easier, but to make them safer. Many of those tasks require a honed set of skills taught by professional dog trainers, which take months to master. The tasks are created for a specific dog breed; for example, not all breeds are considered for take-down maneuvers, based on size or general temperament. Imagine a Chihuahua or Pekingese attempting to tackle a perp. However, such breeds are excellent choices to sniff out explosives, drugs, or fit into small areas. All in all, K-9 units have developed for more than a hundred years, and some of those procedures and techniques haven’t changed much, even those that originated in Europe.

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Slave Patrols: An Early Form of American Policing

“I [patroller’s name], do swear, that I will as searcher for guns, swords, and other weapons among the slaves in my district, faithfully, and as privately as I can, discharge the trust reposed in me as the law directs, to the best of my power. So help me, God.”  -Slave Patroller’s Oath, North Carolina, 1828.[i]

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