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Naval Commander, NCIS Special Agent, Defense Contractor CEO Charged in Contracting Bribery Scheme

Written by FEDagent on . Posted in The Takedown

Federal prosecutors have charged a Navy commander, a Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) special agent, and the CEO of an international defense contractor in a bribery scheme to gain millions of dollars from international port contracts. 

The Justice Department complaints “allege that Leonard Glenn Francis, the CEO of Singapore-based Glenn Defense Marine Asia Ltd. (GDMA), paid U.S. Navy Commander Michael Vannak Khem Misiewicz and NCIS Supervisory Special Agent John Bertrand Beliveau II with luxury travel and prostitutes in exchange for confidential information and other assistance in relation to hundreds of millions of dollars in Navy contracts.” 

Francis and his company, GDMA, provide “husbanding” services to the U.S. Navy, such as coordinating, scheduling, and procuring items and services for ships and submarines as they arrive at port. 

According to court documents, Cmdr. Misiewicz would provide Francis with Navy documents labeled “Confidential,” including advance schedules for movements of ships.  Misiewicz also advocated for GDMA’s interests within the Navy, “urging decisions about port visits and contractor usage that were designed to benefit GDMA.” Misiewicz received paid luxury travel and prostitution services in exchange for his participation in the scheme, and the two communicated through a special personal email account set up by Misiewicz. 

Special Agent Beliveau and Francis are accused of entering into a separate bribery conspiracy. Beliveau “provided Francis with confidential information about the NCIS criminal fraud investigation into GDMA by secretly downloading reports from the NCIS database” and transmitting those to Francis. He also provided “guidance as to how to deal with NCIS inquiries.” Beliveau received paid luxury travel and prostitution services in exchange for his participation in the scheme. 

This ongoing investigation is being conducted by NCIS, the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, the Defense Contract Audit Agency, and the Drug Enforcement Administration. The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs provided significant assistance in this matter, and the Royal Thai Police and the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau Singapore also provided law enforcement assistance. This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Mark Pletcher and Robert Huie of the Southern District of California and Catherine Votaw, Director of Procurement Fraud for the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section. 

To access the press release detailing this takedown, click here.

Tags: Justice Department NCIS Naval Criminal Investigative Service bribery scheme

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