Social Feeds

Be sure to Like and Follow FEDagent on Facebook for exclusive content and news stories affecting your career as federal law enforcement.

Subscribe!

Subscribe to our newsletter. It's FREE!
Read our privacy policy

NOAA's Office of Law Enforcement Cites Florida Man for Violating Marine Mammal Protection Act

Written by FEDagent on . Posted in The Takedown

NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement issued a written warning this month to a Florida man, Anthony Armento, who is accused of violating the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).  The MMPA prohibits people from harassing, capturing, hunting, or killing whales or other marine mammals. MMPA violations can result in civil penalties of up to $11,000 and criminal penalties up to $100,000 and imprisonment of up to a year, or both.

“The MMPA is the primary mechanism that we have to manage and conserve marine animals in the United States,” stated NOAA marine mammal scientist Erin Fougeres. “It does make it illegal to harass, hunt, capture, kill or attempt to do any of those things to a marine mammal.”

The alleged harassment occurred on December 16 in the waters off Pompano Beach, Florida. That morning, a man was seen getting on top of a sperm whale languishing in shallow waters. The whale was pronounced dead hours later the same day.

NOAA’s decision to issue Armento a written citation was to document the violation, as well providing justification for future action should Armento be cited again.

Witness photographs helped law enforcement officials identify Armento as the violator, and have led to arrests in other cases involving harassment of marine mammals. NOAA encourages anyone who sees possible violations of the Marine Mammal Protection Act to report it to NOAA’s enforcement hot line at 1-800-853-1964.

Full coverage of this takedown was provided by NBC’s local affiliate in Miami. Read the full story here.

Contest Corner

Win A Free Full Conference Pass to GovSec 2014

Want to win a FREE ticket to the nation's premiere government security, law enforcement and homeland security expo and conference?

GovSec 2014 is the only event that brings together everything you need to be ready when it counts. This year's conference runs from May 13-15 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington DC.

Read more...

Takedowns

Three Charged with Allegedly Defrauding FCC of $32 Million

The Justice Department announced last week that three individuals have been charged for alleged roles in an approximately $32 million fraud against a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) program that provides discounted telephone services to low-income customers.

The indictment charged three defendants with one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and fifteen substantive counts of wire fraud, false claims, and money laundering.

According to the indictment, the defendants engaged in a scheme to submit false claims with the federal Lifeline Program, which provides affordable, nationwide telephone service to Americans through discounted rates for qualifying low-income customers. The Lifeline Program is administered by the Universal Service Administrative Company, a not-for-profit designated and authorized by the FCC.

Read more...

GEICO's Good Stuff

Tell Us: Why Do You Heart Public Service?

GEICO’s Good Stuff is a column series highlighting great stuff happening in the federal community.

The Public Employees Roundtable (PER) is collecting testimonials from government employees and members of the public in support of an I “Heart” Public Service whiteboard photo campaign. Images will be posted on the PER on Facebook and Instagram pages.

The group behind Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW), which takes place this year from May 4-10, launched the whiteboard campaign in support of this year’s theme: Proud to Serve.

Read more...

Case Law Update

Eleventh Circuit Held Fourth Amendment Violated Where Police Recorded Attorney-Client Conversation Between A Non-incarcerated Suspect and His Attorney

While investigating an alleged misdemeanor violation of a domestic violence injunction, Detective Thomas Marmo and Sergeant Brian Canova monitored, intercepted, and listened to privileged conversations between their non-incarcerated suspect, Joel Studivant, and his attorney, Anne Marie Gennusa, who were in an interview room at the St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office. The police did so without any notice to Studivant and Gennusa, and without a warrant. Det. Marmo also seized (without a warrant) from Gennusa, on Sgt. Canova’s order, a statement written by Studivant. On appeal, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held that the surreptitious recording and monitoring of those attorney-client conversations, without notice to Studivant and his attorney, and without a warrant, violated the Fourth Amendment.

Read more...